Elections have no link with Democracy

If we want transparency from government we have to translate the “officialese” used by government and politicians (and some academics) into an honest and understandable language. - Political systems are only the tools to accomplish something (monarchy, theocracy, democracy, oligarchy, .. and within those systems we can use majority voting, super majority, consensus, liquid democracy, …) but they have to be used with as much knowledge as possible of their advantages and disadvantages. - “Electoral Representation” was never meant to be “democratic” when it was developed. Even when we accept the broad definition of “democracy” there is little or nothing left of a democratic element in Electoral Representation of today. - Defending “democracy” is not compatible with an extensive program that goes beyond the necessary elements for a democracy where the political powers are more in balance. An extensive program also needs enforcement of party discipline on the voting behavior of the elected representatives. Party discipline, in most cases not allowed by law, is part of Particracy, a system that clearly lost his reliability in the past decade, and is on the brink of collapse. - Possible solutions must avoid that while Particracy is loosing his grip, dictatorial systems get the opportunity to step in its place. We already observe the installation of, even not elected, technocrats on important political positions, not only in some countries but also in the EU administration (Catherine Ashton, ..) although it is at those places that electoral representation can play a justified role. Full paper available for download : http://goo.gl/eCPB6s

Paul Nollen, Alexander Zenon / Human Rights
Day 1 at 15:45

View Details...

Financing Political Parties

Political parties need money to pursue their ideas. Lack of financial resources is a common problem of emerging parties. Income sources may, however, influence their political agenda. Some financing models might lead to effective exclusion of some ideologies from the political competition. Should political parties receive money from the state? Should they be allowed to accept donations from corporations? Should there be restrictions on how political parties spend their money? The talk will address these questions and describe internal financial regulations of the Czech Pirate Party, which were introduced in order to prevent corruption and decisions motivated by income increase.

Marcel Kolaja / Human Rights
Not yet scheduled

View Details...

Free of Cyberwar Internet

Cybersecurity issues become a key part of recent debates about the future of the Internet. Metaphors like a “digital Pearl Harbor”, a “cyber cold war”, and a “cyber bomb” are in common use. Not only “authoritarian”, but also more democratic states use these inflated threats to seize a national control of the Internet. The “nationalization” of the Internet becomes a vexed problem. It is necessary now to find a way how we can think about the Internet and protect its positive sides. The social systems theory of N. Luhmann can be purposeful to see new dimensions of the global Internet.

Maxim Simonenko / Human Rights
Day 2 at 14:45

View Details...

Is a right to work up to date and achievable?

By far the largest part of the population depends directly or indirectly as a family member or pensioner on income from work. This work income is not only livelihood, but active participation in the economy and society. The loss of a job is one of the central fears of the vast majority of people. If we do not take these fears and needs seriously, then we take these people in one of their central concerns seriously not. In the presentation ideas are presented, how the article 23 right to work of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights could be implemented. Note: The planned presentation was already held in similar form on the EuWiKon 2013. See attached presentation. The subject of right to work has been hotly debated in the AG Wirtschaft of the German Pirate Party.

Arne Pfeilsticker / Human Rights
Day 2 at 14:45

View Details...

Legislative aspects of drones using and human rights

Legislative aspects of drones using and human rights

Konstantin Ostrovskii / Human Rights
Not yet scheduled

View Details...

Practical experiances exercising human rights as an EU-official and whistleblower

This talk with discussion will provide an overview of the experiances of the speaker during and after his whistleblowing within the European Commission. This lead to more than 25 court cases at the EU-Courts in Luxembourg and a similar number of complaints at the European Ombudsman as well as to experiances with the practical usage of investigate and supervisory powers by OLAF, its supervisory committee, the European Court of Auditors, the Council, the European Parliament and other bodies and organistions. Main focus will be on the treatment of procedural and human rights at the EU Courts (e.g. in cases F-199/11P and F-198/11P) dealing with freedom of information rights, free speech rights and fair process rights. The speaker will also explain why EU-officials enjoy no external control of human rights standards. A short summary of the story is available at http://goo.gl/1oFKBC

Guido Strack / Human Rights
Day 1 at 12:05

View Details...

Stop our robotic overlords – no-drone zones in Europe

Current debate about drones/UAVs is mostly focused on the moral implications of drones killing or targeting people in Afghanistan or Pakistan. At the same time drones are introduced in border surveillance at EUROSUR/Frontex, some European police forces already use UAVs, they become increasingly popular for surveillance for example for the premises of Deutsche Bahn, and Amazon and DHL are experimenting with delivery prototypes. This all happens in Europe more or less without regulation. My talk will focus on where regulation is necessary: if drones are used for policing, where is the intervention threshold? Is it OK to use Flying Eyes for traffic observations? Who protects neighbours of railway premises from collateral surveillance? Do we want large drones that can be hacked and are prone to crashes flying over inhabited areas? Are we fine with unmanned aerial and aquatic vehicles that can be armed to patrol European borders?

Martin Kliehm / Human Rights
Not yet scheduled

View Details...

Transparency in nuclear disarmament

Increased transparency of nuclear weapons related information is an indispensable prerequisite for more progress in nuclear disarmament and its verification. For many years, and on various occasions, it has been demanded by the international community. Today, the world is not even informed about the status quo of nuclear disarmament: How many nuclear weapons are stationed in which countries? Which types of weapons? How many are being halt in reserve and how many are being dismantled? The numbers are not exactly known, the reports on weapon dismantlement remain vague. Only a few countries have published figures of their possessings of nuclear materials, the quantities of others are still shrouded in secrecy. The reasons for secrecy are many fold: An obvious one is the fact that some information might be useful in illegal nuclear weapon programs elsewhere. But other reasons are doubtful: They include strategic superiority but also conservative inertia, bureaucratic structures and democratic deficiences. This presentation will focus on information related to nuclear weapons with the following questions: Is transparency of the information useful for nuclear disarmament and arms control? Would transparency enhance the risk of nuclear proliferation? Would it pose other security risks, and which kind of security risks are they? Is the current secrecy of information adequate? Which reasons for secrecy may be assumed? The presentation concludes with several demands for more nuclear transparency that the International Pirates should endorse.

Annette Schaper / Human Rights
Day 1 at 11:00

View Details...

What you always wanted to know about Whistleblowing

Talk and discussion about Whistleblowing, focussing on practical, psychological and legal aspects and providing answers to questions like: Why is whistleblowing important? Which different forms there are? What does it need to take place and to be successfull? And explaining why technical anonymity - if at all possible - can not be the solution to the whole problem.

Guido Strack / Human Rights
Not yet scheduled

View Details...

Why separation of Church and State is an important issue for Pirates

Secularism, the separation of church/religion and state is an important principle of fairness, equality and transparency. No religious group should be privilegied by the state, thus no religious or a-religious group is discriminated against. Religion is a private matter, not a matter of state. In my talk I will outline why this matter is important for the pirate movement and what are good strategies to achieve something in this field.

Valentin Abgottspon / Human Rights
Day 1 at 12:50

View Details...


Platinum

no ©